Luận văn the effect of storytelling on efl grade 5 students' oral performance at an minh primary school in kien giang province

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ABSTRACT
Storytelling has been an English teaching method which was studied by a number
of researchers. This current paper analyzed the effect of storytelling on EFL grade 5
students’ oral performance in the English language. Its implementation took place at An
Minh Primary school in Kien Giang Province. The objective of this study was to measure
the students’ oral performance through the storytelling method. This study used
experimental study methods with a sample which was divided into an experimental group
(EG) and a control group (CG). The EG was taught by using the storytelling technique,
while the CG was taught by using a conventional technique for teaching speaking. In
collecting the data, tests and a questionnaire were used. The results showed that the oral
performance of the EG students, taught with the storytelling technique, improved much
more and were significantly better than the improvement in the oral performance of the
CG students taught by using the conventional technique. Moreover, the qualitative
information helped us to understand that the participants have positive emotional,
behavioral, and cognitive attitudes toward storytelling.
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Statement of authorship........................................................................................................i
Acknowledgements..............................................................................................................ii
Abstract...............................................................................................................................iii
Table of contents.................................................................................................................iv
List of abbreviations..........................................................................................................viii
List of tables........................................................................................................................ix
List of figures.....................................................................................................................xii
CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION………………………….………...……………..1
1.1 Rationale ………………………………..…………………….………..…..……….....1
1.2 Statement of the problem..…………………….…….…………….………. ……....….4
1.3 Research aims..……………………………………………...…….……..………..…...5
1.4 Research questions………………………………………….…………………..……..5
1.5 Research hypothesis……………………………………………………………..….....5
1.6 Significance of the research……………………………………………………….…...6
1.7 Scope of the study………………………………………………………….…………..6
1.8 Organization of the research…………………..…………………..……………….......6
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CHAPTER TWO: LITERATURE REVIEW…………..………….…………..……....8
2.1 Speaking…………………..……………………………………………………….…..8
2.2 Teaching speaking……………… …………………………………………..………...9
2.3 Young Language Learners…………………………………………………….….…..10
2.4 Characteristics of Young Learners…….…………………………………………..…10
2.5 Teaching speaking to Young Learners and its related problems………………...…...12
2.6 Story and storytelling……………………………………………………...………….13
2.7 Storytelling: characteristics and purpose………………………………..……...…….15
2.8 Storytelling: Types and steps…………………………………………………..……..17
2.9 Empirical research on teaching English to YLLs through storytelling…………........18
CHAPTER THREE: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY……………………………...23
3.1 Research design………………………………………………………………..……..23
3.2. Research site………………………………………………………………..……......24
3.3 Participants……………………………………………………………………...……24
3.4 Research instruments……………………………………………………………..…..25
3.4.1 Test design……………………………………………………………..…………...25
3.4.1.1 Pretest ……………..……………………………………………..…..…..............25
3.4.1.2 Posttest……………………………………………………………….……...…....25
3.4.1.3 Test administration and scoring method………………………….….….…….….26
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3.4.2 Questionnaire, piloting and reliability………………………………….….….……26
3.5 Materials and treatment procedure…...……………………………………………...28
3.5.1 Materials…………………………………………………..………………………..28
3.5.2 Treatment procedure………………………………………….……………..……...29
3.6 Data collection………….……………………………………….……….……...........30
3.7 Data analysis………………………………………………………..………………...31
CHAPTER FOUR: FINDINGS AND DISCUSSION…………………………..…….32
4.1 Findings………………………………………………………………….………..….32
4.1.1 Testing the effect of storytelling on grade 5 students’ oral performance…………..32
4.1.1.1 Participant analysis…………………………………………………………….....32
4.1.1.2 Normality test………………………………………………………………..…...33
4.1.1.3 Pretest results of the Control group and Experimental group………...………….33
4.1.1.4 Posttest results of the Control group and Experimental group……….............…..35
4.1.1.5 Pretest and posttest results of the Experimental group………………….…….…36
4.2 The EFL grade 5 students’ attitudes toward storytelling………….…………….…....37
4.2.1 The behavioral aspect of attitude toward storytelling……………….............……..38
4.2.2 The cognitive aspect of attitude toward storytelling…………………………..…...41
4.2.3 The emotional aspect of attitude toward storytelling………………………...…….42
4.3 Discussion………………………………………………………………………..…...45
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4.3.1 Research Question 1…………………………………………………………..…....45
4.3.2 Research Question 2………………………………………………………..……....46
CHAPTER FIVE: CONCLUSION, PEDAGOGICAL IMPLICATIONS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS………………………………………………..…………...…50
5.1 Summary of key findings……………………………………………………...……..50
5.1.1 Research Question 1: Students’ oral performance in pretest and posttest…..…..….50
5.1.2 Research Question 2: The grade 5 students’ attitudes toward storytelling…………51
5.2 Pedagogical Implications…………………………………………………………......52
5.2.1 To the English language teachers……………………………………..………..…..52
5.2.2 To the administrators………………………………………………………..……...53
5.3 Limitations…………………………………………………………………..………..53
5.4 Suggestions for futher research…………………………………………………...….53
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APPENDICES
Appendix 1: Sample Lesson plan.......................................................................................64
Appendix 2: Pre-test...........................................................................................................68
Appendix 3: Post-test..........................................................................................................69
Appendix 4: Rubrics...........................................................................................................70
Appendix 5A: Questionnaire (English version) ................................................................72
Appendix 5B: Questionnaire (Vietnamese version)...........................................................74
Appendix 6: Pre-test and Post-test Scores of both Control group and Experimental
group...................................................................................................................................76
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LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
ASEAN Association of Southeast Asian Nations.
AMPS An Minh Primary School.
BCEA Behavioral, Cognitive, Emotional Attitude.
CAR Classroom Action Research.
CG Control Group.
CCI Contextualized Comprehensible Input.
CLT Communicative Language Teaching.
EG Experimental Group.
EFL English as a Foreign Language.
L1 first language.
L2 second language.
M Mean.
MOET Ministry of Education and Training.
NFL The National Foreign Languages.
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OPT Oxford Placement Test.
RQ Research Question.
SD Standard Deviation.
Sig. Significance.
SPSS Statistic Package for the Social Science.
STT Storytelling Technique.
TBLT Task-Based Language Teaching.
TPRS Total Physical Response Storytelling.
WTO World Trade Organization.
YLs Young Learners.
YLLs Young Language Learners.
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LIST OF TABLES
Table 1: Reliability Analysis (Cronbach’s Alpha)……………………………..…...……27
Table 2. Treatment procedure………………………………………………………...…..29
Table 3: Tests of Normality………………………………………………………...…….33
Table 4. Descriptive statistics of the two groups on the speaking pretest………….…….34
Table 5. Mann-Whitney test of the mean scores of CG and EG on the pretest…….....….35
Table 6. Descriptive statistics of the two groups on the speaking posttest…….…....….. 35
Table 7. Mann-Whitney test of the mean scores of CG and EG on the posttest….….......36
Table 8. Wilcoxon Test for the Experimental Group before and after the treatment…….37
Table 9. Respondents’ positive & negative behavioral attitudes toward storytelling…....39
Table 10. Respondents’ positive & negative cognitive attitudes toward storytelling…....42
Table 11. Respondents’ positive & negative emotional attitudes toward storytelling...…43
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LIST OF FIGURES
Figure1. A pretest – posttest non-randomized control-group design…………...………..24
xii
CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION
This chapter, the Introduction, presents the sections including the rationale, the
statement of the problem, the research aims, the research questions, the research
hypothesis, the significance of the research, the scope of the study and the organization of
the research. Each section will be described in details.
1.1 RATIONALE
In this contemporary world, where mobility for a variety of purposes, people the
world over are inclined to using an international language to meet their own objectives in
life and at work. It is English which is now used widely in a great many countries for
education, business, science and technology, culture, politics and diplomacy. Vietnam is
not an exception when it is now a full member of ASEAN, WTO, and is going to join
other international trade organizations. Therefore, teaching and learning English
effectively presents teachers, learners, educational administrators at different levels as
well as other stakeholders a number of challenges.
Vietnam has been facing with many changes in teaching and learning foreign
languages in general, especially English in particular since the initiation of Doi Moi
policy in 1986. The National Foreign Languages Project 2020 (hereafter NFL Project
2020) is the latest breakthrough that attracts tremedous efforts and investments from top
government leaders, Ministry of Education and Training (MOET) officials down to
provincial levels and teachers and students, especially parents and society alike with a
hope to effectively improve the quality of English language learning and teaching across
all school levels in Vietnam. Within this context, attention has been made in this decade
to encourage and inspire new ways of teaching and learning English in Vietnam at all
levels of education and training where English is now a compulsory subject in all schools,
colleges and universities in Viet Nam.
In an attempt to enhance the teaching and learning English at primary schools in Vietnam,
as part of NFL Project 2020, Vietnamese Ministry of Education and Training (MOET)
1
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